Your web property is “www.example.com”. You set up a URL goal of “/thankyou” and a Match Type of “Begins with”. Which of the following URLs will count as goals?

QUESTION

Your web property is “www.example.com”. You set up a URL goal of “/thankyou” and a Match Type of “Begins with”. Which of the following URLs will count as goals?

example.com/thankyou.php

All of these would count as goals.

example.com/thankyou/receipt.php

example.com/thankyou.html

The correct answer is:

Your web property is “www.example.com”. You set up a URL goal of “/thankyou” and a Match Type of “Begins with”. Which of the following URLs will count as goals?
Explanation: 

Which of these can join offline business systems data with online data collected by Google Analytics?

QUESTION

Which of these can join offline business systems data with online data collected by Google Analytics?

Data import

User ID

AdWords Linking

Goal tracking

The correct answer is:

Data import

Which of these can join offline business systems data with online data collected by Google Analytics?
Explanation:

Data Import lets you join the data generated by your offline business systems with the online data collected by Analytics. This can help you organize, analyze and act upon this unified data view in ways that are better aligned with your specific and unique business needs. For example, as a web publisher, you could join hits collected by Analytics with data dimensions exported from your CMS and CRM systems to analyze the relative contributions of authors to your site.
Read more here: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/3191589

Metrics cannot be paired with dimensions of the same scope.

QUESTION

Metrics cannot be paired with dimensions of the same scope.

False

True

The correct answer is:

False

Metrics cannot be paired with dimensions of the same scope.
Explanation:

Dimensions are attributes of your data. For example, the dimension City indicates the city, for example, “Paris” or “New York”, from which a session originates. The dimension Page indicates the URL of a page that is viewed.

Metrics are quantitative measurements. The metric Sessions is the total number of sessions. The metric Pages/Session is the average number of pages viewed per session.

Not every metric can be combined with every dimension. Each dimension and metric has a scope: user-level, session-level, or hit-level. In most cases, it only makes sense to combine dimensions and metrics that share the same scope.

Read more here: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1033861

How does Google Analytics credit a channel that contributes to a conversion prior to a transaction?

QUESTION

How does Google Analytics credit a channel that contributes to a conversion prior to a transaction?

Last-click attribution

Primary conversion

Assisted conversion

Second-to-last-click attribution

The correct answer is:

Assisted conversion

How does Google Analytics credit a channel that contributes to a conversion prior to a transaction?
Explanation:

Assist interaction is any interaction that is on the conversion path but is not the last interaction. If a channel appears anywhere—except as the final interaction—on a conversion path, it is considered an assist for that conversion. The higher these numbers, the more important the assist role of the channel.
Read more here: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1191204

The Assisted Conversions report summarizes the roles and contributions of your channels. A channel can play three roles in a conversion path:

Last interaction is the interaction that immediately precedes the conversion.

Assist interaction is any interaction that is on the conversion path but is not the last interaction.

First interaction is the first interaction on the conversion path; it’s a kind of assist interaction.

To calculate the metrics in this report, Analytics looks across all the conversion paths for the conversions you’re analyzing.

Once Google Analytics has processed the data it collects, you can still recover any data that was filtered out.

QUESTION

Once Google Analytics has processed the data it collects, you can still recover any data that was filtered out.

False

True

The correct answer is:

False

Once Google Analytics has processed the data it collects, you can still recover any data that was filtered out.
Explanation:

some Analytics features fundamentally alter how data is collected or processed in your account in ways that cannot be reversed, you should duplicate the original view before making changes.
Read more here: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/3256366

Because some Analytics features fundamentally alter how data is collected or processed in your account in ways that cannot be reversed, you should duplicate the original view before making changes. Always keep original views unchanged and add filters or other reporting features to the duplicate views. This lets you use the original view as the canonical source, or reference point, for all the data you’re collecting in that property, and customize the other views to meet specific reporting needs. Learn more about views and about properties.

Views are associated with properties. Duplicated views can only be associated with the same property the original view. You need Edit permission to copy a view. To copy a view:

Sign in to Google Analytics..

Click Admin, and navigate to the view you want to copy.

In the VIEW column, click View Settings.

Click Copy view.

Click Copy View.

Settings and features controlled at the view level (like filters, Goals, users and their permissions) are duplicated in copied views. Cost source links and shared assets (like annotations, Segments, and alerts) are not duplicated into copied views.

By default, when does an Analytics session expire?

QUESTION

By default, when does an Analytics session expire?

At noon every day

When a user opens another browser window

When a user is inactive on your website for more than 30 minutes

After 30 minutes, regardless of user activity on your website

The correct answer is:

When a user is inactive on your website for more than 30 minutes

By default, when does an Analytics session expire?
Explanation:

Sessions and campaigns end after a specific amount of time passes. By default, sessions end after 30 minutes of inactivity and campaigns end after six months. You can change the settings so sessions and campaigns end after the specified amount of time has passed.

Read more here: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2795871

Sessions and campaigns end after a specific amount of time passes. By default, sessions end after 30 minutes of inactivity and campaigns end after six months. You can change the settings so sessions and campaigns end after the specified amount of time has passed.

The length of a session and campaign depends on your site and business. Here are a few ideas to get you started thinking about session and campaign timeouts:

If your site automatically signs a user out after being inactive for a certain amount of time, set the session timeout to match that length of time.

Lengthen the session time if you have a lot of content and expect users to take a long time engaging with that content. Conversely, shorten the session time if the site has a small amount of content.

Set the campaign timeout handling to the same amount of time the campaign is going to run or expected to be relevant. Clicks to a social media micro-campaign might not be relevant for more than a few days after launch.

Campaign timeout cannot be greater than two years. Sessions cannot be less than one minute or greater than four hours.

These settings are applied in the admin settings of each property in your account. To change these settings:

Navigate to a property. If you’re not in the settings menu, click Admin. Select the account and property you want to edit.

From the property column, click Tracking Info then Session Settings.

Under Timeout Handling, use the controls to set Session timeout and Campaign timeout.

Click Apply.

Learn more about setting session timeout and campaign timeout in your tracking code.

Which data table display compares report metrics to the website average?

QUESTION

Which data table display compares report metrics to the website average?

Performance

Comparison

Pivot

Percentage

The correct answer is:

Pivot

Which data table display compares report metrics to the website average?
Explanation:

Comparison displays a bar chart plotting the performance of the selected metrics relative to the site average.

https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2604608?hl=en#data_table_view

Read more here: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1009642

You can rearrange the information in the table for certain reports by pivoting your data on a second dimension. For example, let’s say that you want to see the bounce rate and number of page views for each landing page, and then compare that data against each campaign. You would set up the following pivot table within the Behavior > Site Content > Landing Pages report.

From the Pivot by selector (top left of table), select Campaign.

From the two Pivot metrics menus, select Bounce Rate and Pages/Session so those metrics appear alongside each keyword in the table.

The lower portion of the Explorer tab displays data in tabular form. The primary dimension and metrics displayed depend on the type of report and on the metric group selected in the Explorer tab controls.

Data-table controls include:

Primary dimension links: change the primary dimension in the report.

Plot Rows button: add rows you’ve selected to the graph.

To remove a secondary dimension, click X in the dimension column’s header.

Secondary dimension menu: add another dimension to the report.

To remove a secondary dimension, click X in the dimension column’s header.



To remove a secondary dimension, click X in the dimension column’s header.

Default: basic alphanumeric sort. The default order is high to low. You can change this by clicking the column header.

Absolute change: sorts date range comparison data by amount of change rather than absolute values

Weighted: sorts percentage data in order of importance instead of numerical order.

Sort Type menu: change the order of the rows in the data table. Your choices are:

  • Default: basic alphanumeric sort. The default order is high to low. You can change this by clicking the column header.

    Default: basic alphanumeric sort. The default order is high to low. You can change this by clicking the column header.

  • Absolute change: sorts date range comparison data by amount of change rather than absolute values

    Absolute change: sorts date range comparison data by amount of change rather than absolute values

  • Weighted: sorts percentage data in order of importance instead of numerical order.

    Weighted: sorts percentage data in order of importance instead of numerical order.

Default: basic alphanumeric sort. The default order is high to low. You can change this by clicking the column header.

Absolute change: sorts date range comparison data by amount of change rather than absolute values

Weighted: sorts percentage data in order of importance instead of numerical order.

Search: display only rows matching your search term. Click advanced to define more complex filters.

There are a few additional controls not shown in the interface map image at the beginning of this article:

Pagination controls: change the number of rows displayed, jump to a specific page of data, or navigate page by page using the controls below the data table.

Refresh report link: update the data displayed in the report by clicking the link located at the very bottom of the page, next to the generation date.

The first column of the table is the primary dimension. Your data is grouped by this column. If you select a secondary dimension, that appears in the next column, further grouping your data. The remaining columns in the table are the metrics associated with the selected dimensions.

You can perform a number of actions directly on the table, such as:

Use the checkboxes preceding a row to select that row. You can then plot the selected rows on your graph view using the Plot Rows button.

Hover over the ? icon in a column label to see a definition of that dimenion or metric.

Sort the table by a column by clicking the column header. Note: this is a simple ASCII sort. To perform a more sophisticated sort, use the Sort Type button.

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